Tuesday, August 24, 2021

Tuesday Slice: The joy and the pain

I'll never forget the joy I felt ordering books for the first time as a librarian.  I can't forget it, because nine years later, I still feel that joy.  I start stocking my shopping carts even as the previous year's budget is spent, loading them up with award winners from spring announcements and recommendations from publishers, blogs, and other librarians.  There's always a series or three to fill, too.

This past spring was no different, except that I have the added challenge of spiffying up an older collection.  (Yes, I know I made a word up there.)  I have to balance out my wants--all those bright, shiny new publications--with my needs--updated nonfiction, replacing worn classics to increase their curb appeal.

After receiving my district book budget this year, I peeked at the shopping carts I'd started on my two favorite jobbers' sites...and the pain hit.  I am already just over my budget limit, and I need to keep some funds in reserve for next year's Bluebonnet Award nominees and books from the spring library conference.  

Do I start culling my list...or do I ask for more money from my campus?

I think it will be less painful to do the latter.  I have a feeling they love the joy of new books, too.

14 comments:

  1. I've always envied the power of the librarian to order all those new books. A few years ago I got a grant from NCTE for books and it was that joy that I envied when the box came. I feel you!

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    1. It is powerful, but a bit like blind gift giving...when the books come in, I wait to see if they are being checked out from the new books display!

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  2. Let there be more books! I hope you can secure the extra funds. I'm grateful for all the school librarians keeping kids' hands full of books!

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    1. Yes to book flooding our students! I give away a lot of books, too, that have been discarded from our literacy library and from our collection (usually multiple copies of good books) for kids to take home and teachers to add to their classroom collections.

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  3. I remember building a classroom library from scratch when I moved to Rhode Island. Goodness, it's SO easy to go over budget. I feel your pain! Ask for money and see if you can get it... maybe, just maybe, you will.

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    1. I will definitely be asking, Stacey. And I read of one district that actually GAVE TEACHERS MONEY for their classroom libraries--imagine that!

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  4. Buying new books is the best, especially when it's somebody else's money!

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    1. It felt weird the first time, not so much anymore!

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  5. I've been poking around the shelves and finding so many titles that need to be added. Ask for more money.

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    1. Definitely going to do that, Alice--from both principal and Ami. I may have to decimate the collection to make the point...

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  6. Chris, the library is the hub of the school so ask away. Your goal is to bring in a variety of books to entice learners to become lifelong readers. I commend you on the research you delve into to find the just right books to spiffy up your collection. Good luck!

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    1. Thank you, Carol! I'm looking forward to welcoming our students back next week, can't wait to see where they steer me for their wants and needs, too.

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  7. Ask for the money, Chris! There's nothing like the allure of new books, especially award-winning ones. I filled in for a fifth-grade teacher for a little while yesterday and I asked the kids what their favorite thing or subject is in school. Only one said "Reading" ... all the justification I need for a load of new books! Hope you'll let us know what transpires. All the best to you as the students return and this new year gets underway .

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